Evolution of Communication (Part 2)

1. Prehistory to the 15th century:

Fire, smoke, and horns were used to communicate to others who were distances away. Homing pigeons were used in the 5 th century to carry messages. The 4 th – 15 th century introduced new inventions and the use of hydraulics and maritime semaphores to send messages (especially at sea). Containers filled with water and floating rods helped to send information.

2. 1800s and 1900s:

In the 1800s, we become acquainted with newspapers, signal lamps, and the electric telegraph. The telephone was invented in 1867 and the television in 1927. There Experimental video telephones were introduced in 1936.

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3. 1960s to 2015:

Computer networking is the biggest innovation in the world of communication that humans have yet to experience. Email, instant messaging, and texting have become almost crucial to our everyday lives. Smart phones are mobile handheld computers.


Infographic:

Take a look at this timeline that shows the evolution of how people communicated with each other particularly from a distance. From smoke signals to now being able to quickly connect with nearly anyone in the world shows how technology progresses over time.

https://www.onecallnow.com/blog/02/infographic-the-evolution-of-communication-2/

Ann Holtzapple: Infographic The Evolution of Communication  source: https://www.onecallnow.com/blog/02/infographic-the-evolution-of-communication-2/

Ann Holtzapple: Infographic The Evolution of Communication

source: https://www.onecallnow.com/blog/02/infographic-the-evolution-of-communication-2/



You can click the following links to access the complete articles about the Evolution of Communication from One Call Now – a voice, test, and email messaging company.

https://www.onecallnow.com/blog/02/evolution-of-communication-prehistory-to-the-15th-century/

https://www.onecallnow.com/blog/02/evolution-of-communication-1800s-and-1900s/

https://www.onecallnow.com/blog/02/evolution-of-communication-1960s-to-2015/



Notice: Every blog, product, post, or creative piece is designed as a reminder to speak words fitly spoken - words that encourage, heal, or help in some way. We create a place that speaks to the power of words and how words affect us in our everyday lives. Sometimes something funny, sometimes gleaning from history. Maybe it’s science-based, informational, inspirational, or just a story to share. It is our hope that everything Apples in Silver moves us toward being conscience of the words we speak as we aim to make someone’s day better with the words we say.

Thank you for joining our community.

Creatively yours,

Lynette

Ancient Communication (Part 1)

Technology is as old as human society. It is the use of knowledge, inventions, and discoveries to make life better. This is the premise of Ancient Communication Technology, a book written by Michael and Mary B. Woods.

The word technology comes from two Greek words: techne: art or craft and logos: logic or reason.

“There are many forms of technology. Medicine is one form. Agriculture and machinery are others. Another form of technology that helps make all other kinds of technology possible is communication. To communicate is to share news, ideas, feelings, and images with other people. Communication involves more than just speaking, writing, and reading. It includes art, music, and other nonverbal forms of sharing information. It also includes the equipment people use to share information. Paper, pens, ink, paintbrushes, and books are all forms of communication technology.”

The authors propose that all modern communication techniques owe something to the inventions of the past.

The Dead Sea Scrolls image source: https://www.imj.org.il/en/wings/shrine-book/dead-sea-scrolls

The Dead Sea Scrolls
image source: https://www.imj.org.il/en/wings/shrine-book/dead-sea-scrolls

Here are a few of those ancient inventions.

30,000 B.C. Ancient people paint in caves for the first time.

3000s B.C. Mesopotamian writers begin scratching pictographic records on clay tablets.

3100 B.C. Egyptian people learn how to make paper from papyrus.

2800 B.C. Middle Eastern people begin to use pictures to stand for specific sounds.

500s B.C. The Greeks develop the visual telegraph (a series of towers that could be seen

from the tower nearest to it. Holes at the top represented letters; lighting fires

in the holes sent messages, such as ‘danger’.

800s B.C. The Greeks adopt the Phoenician alphabet.

400s B.C. Drama and playwriting flourish in Greece.

190 B.C. The Greeks develop parchment.

59 B.C. Roman leader Julius Caesar starts Acta Diurna (Daily Events), the world’s first daily newspaper.

40 B.C. Roman historian Gaius Asinius Pollio constructs Rome’s first public library.

A.D. 105 Ts’ai Lun creates paper from wood pulp.

100s The Romans begin to write in cursive.

700s Chinese papermaking techniques begin to spread across Europe.

1300 Europe enters the Renaissance.

1500s European settlers arrive in the Americas.

1799 French soldiers discover the Rosetta stone in Egypt (a stone inscribed with three distinct forms of writing – hieroglyphics, demotic writing, and Greek).

1800s Native Americans refine Plains Sign Language (a direct signaling system; its symbols are understood without any reference to a spoken language).

1940s Archaeologists discover Mayan murals at Bonampak in Mexico.

1972 United States scientists launch the Pioneer 10 (the first mission to the planet Jupiter).

2010 Israel announces plans to make the Dead Sea Scrolls available to view online.

The Rosetta Stone image source:  https://www.britishmuseum.org

The Rosetta Stone
image source: https://www.britishmuseum.org

Notice: Every blog, product, post, or creative piece is designed as a reminder to speak words fitly spoken - words that encourage, heal, or help in some way. We create a place that speaks to the power of words and how words affect us in our everyday lives. Sometimes something funny, sometimes gleaning from history. Maybe it’s science-based, informational, inspirational, or just a story to share. It is our hope that everything Apples in Silver moves us toward being conscience of the words we speak as we aim to make someone’s day better with the words we say.

Thank you for joining our community.

Creatively yours,

Lynette

Eloquent And Exquisite

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Back in the olden days of the 1960s, my mom made greeting cards for birthdays and holidays. Her family members were the recipients of these hand-painted designs and original prose, personally created for that person who meant so much to her. The cards were never printed or copied so each was an original.

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Today, the greeting card business is thriving ($7.5 billion in sales), holding its own in the age of technology and the convenience of sending an electronic message. It is my hope that handwritten notes, cards, and messages will never become obsolete and that they will forever remain keepsakes that we cherish for many generations. The eloquent words and exquisite designs makes a great combination.

Notice: Every blog, product, post, or creative piece is designed as a reminder to speak words fitly spoken - words that encourage, heal, or help in some way. We create a place that speaks to the power of words and how words affect us in our everyday lives. Sometimes something funny, sometimes gleaning from history. Maybe it’s science-based, informational, inspirational, or just a story to share. It is our hope that everything Apples in Silver moves us toward being conscience of the words we speak as we aim to make someone’s day better with the words we say.

Thank you for joining our community.

Creatively yours,

Lynette

The Chef, the Servers, and the Guests

Jesus cooked, the disciples served, and the women didn’t have to clean up after!

“I have no help! I was so bent-out-of-shape about all the work that needed to get done. But the scriptures

about the two fish and five loaves spoke loud and clear and I had a new viewpoint: Jesus cooked, the

disciples served, and the women didn’t have to clean up after! Right then it seemed as if the weight of all

my worries lifted. I had new insight on how Jesus felt about me.

Further reading helped me to see that Jesus performed this miracle purely out of compassion.

No one was starving, no one was desperate.

There was no crisis…

What a delight to be fed a sumptuous meal to encourage community, break bread together, and to

be sure that no one would become weak from having missed a meal. No one was starving, no one was

desperate. No one was dying. There was no crisis, no crucial emergency; no dire situation. Jesus cared

enough to feed a multitude of people who had come to hear his teachings and be healed of their

diseases.

Read more here: https://lovedandblessed.com/blog/the-chef-the-servers-and-the-guests

Notice: Every blog, product, post, or creative piece is designed as a reminder to speak words fitly spoken - words that encourage, heal, or help in some way. We create a place that speaks to the power of words and how words affect us in our everyday lives. Sometimes something funny, sometimes gleaning from history. Maybe it’s science-based, informational, inspirational, or just a story to share. It is our hope that everything Apples in Silver moves us toward being conscience of the words we speak as we aim to make someone’s day better with the words we say.

Thank you for joining our community.

Creatively yours,

Lynette

A Way With Words

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A Way with Words is an energetic podcast that I really enjoy. The lively conversation with hosts, Martha Barnette and Grant Barett, and the call-in questions from guests, make for a unique program that is quite informative. The hosts talk with callers about slang, old sayings, new words, word origins, family expressions, and regional dialects. These odd and sometimes familiar terminologies are examined through family dynamics, culture and history.


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Here are a few expressions from callers inquiring about their origins:


Catch you on the flip side: this is a term used by CB (Citizens Band) radio truckers meaning ‘see you later’ or ‘I will see you on my return trip’. Although more obsolete today because of the internet and cell phones, some truckers still find it useful particularly in rural areas where it may be difficult to pick up a cell signal.



Don’t look a gift horse in the mouth: originated when horses were more commonplace in society. Horses were considered properties of some prestige. As they grow older however, their gums begin to recede. The meaning suggests that we should not inspect a gift too closely.



Making milk sandwiches: a term used when people would go to the store and all the bread and milk would be gone. They would ask, “What are people doing, making milk sandwiches?”



As clean as a whistle: does not necessarily mean a physical whistle. It’s the sound itself, clean and clear; ‘as clear as the whistle of a bird’. The term originated in the 19th century.



A Way with Words will research words or phrases you’ve heard your grandmother say, something you thought was exclusive to your family, or the roots of an expression significant to a geographical area. It’s educational and fun!

Notice: Every blog, product, post, or creative piece is designed as a reminder to speak words fitly spoken - words that encourage, heal, or help in some way. We create a place that speaks to the power of words and how words affect us in our everyday lives. Sometimes something funny, sometimes gleaning from history. Maybe it’s science-based, informational, inspirational, or just a story to share. It is our hope that everything Apples in Silver moves us toward being conscience of the words we speak as we aim to make someone’s day better with the words we say.

Thank you for joining our community.

Creatively yours,

Lynette

Somewhere Someone

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Somewhere someone is celebrating a birth … another mourning a loss. Hard-working people are finding it difficult to meet monthly obligations. Others do it with ease having resources to spare. Someone is facing an insurmountable challenge. Another is in a place where things just couldn’t be better. Some are content, others are restless.

When a friend or family member goes through a tough time, we may not be able to fix their problem or intervene to the extent that would change their situation. Someone may have recently gotten a promotion, received good news, or had an unexpected triumph. There are varying degrees and vast differences between what people are experiencing at any given time in their lives. Sometimes it’s good – other times, not so much.

A text, an email, a card, message, phone call, face time or face-to-face would mean so much. Someone within your circle would benefit from your words of affirmation and encouragement. We all could stand to hear words of hope and reinforcement. Whether one’s current state is solemn or celebratory; we welcome words fitly spoken, words that move us onward, words that lift us up.

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Shower someone with accolades, bolster another to keep them motivated. Use your words to inspire, create positive change, or support a friend going through a tough time. Someone could use words of wisdom and good counsel. Reassurance to remind someone to keep up the good work, or letting them know that they’re valued and appreciated will go a long way in making someone’s day with the words you say.

Notice: Every blog, product, post, or creative piece is designed as a reminder to speak words fitly spoken - words that encourage, heal, or help in some way. We create a place that speaks to the power of words and how words affect us in our everyday lives. Sometimes something funny, sometimes gleaning from history. Maybe it’s science-based, informational, inspirational, or just a story to share. It is our hope that everything Apples in Silver moves us toward being conscience of the words we speak as we aim to make someone’s day better with the words we say.

Thank you for joining our community.

Creatively yours,

Lynette

Weird Words

Take a look at these weird words! Most are difficult to pronounce and will not easily roll off your tongue. In fact, they are rare and obsolete. Some of them have not been used for centuries! I chose these because their meanings relate to our theme – words, expressions and the things we say.

battologist [bat-tah-luh-djist] || someone who repeats the same thing needlessly. From a Greek word meaning ‘stammerer’.

galimatias [gal-uh-mat-ee-us] || nonsense, meaningless talk. Of unknown origin, first found in the sixteenth century.

inaniloquent [in-an-nill-uh-kwunt] || an obsolete and rare adjective meaning ‘full of idle talk, foolishly babbling’. From Latin words meaning ‘inane’ and ‘to speak’.

jactance [jack-tunce] || a rare word meaning ‘boasting’.

kyriolexy [kye-ree-oh-leck-see] || the use of literal expressions. From Greek words meaning ‘proper’ and ‘speaking’.

logomachy [luh-gah-muh-kee] || fighting about words, a fight about words. From Greek words meaning ‘word’ and ‘fighting’.

peenge [peendj] || to complain in a whining voice. One suspects that the qualification “in a whining voice’ is unnecessary. Perhaps formed from whinge, and influenced by peevish.

satisdiction [sat-is-dick-shun] || a word meaning ‘saying enough’. If only we knew to shut up after achieving satisdiction. From Latin words meaning ‘enough’ and ‘saying’, on the model of satisfaction.

Notice: Every blog, product, post, or creative piece is designed as a reminder to speak words fitly spoken - words that encourage, heal, or help in some way. We create a place that speaks to the power of words and how words affect us in our everyday lives. Sometimes something funny, sometimes gleaning from history. Maybe it’s science-based, informational, inspirational, or just a story to share. It is our hope that everything Apples in Silver moves us toward being conscience of the words we speak as we aim to make someone’s day better with the words we say.

Thank you for joining our community.

Creatively yours,

Lynette

Tongue Twisters

See if you can recognize the author of the following verse:

The great Jehovah speaks to us

In Genesis and Exodus,

Leviticus and Numbers, three,

Followed by Deuteronomy.

It’s Theodor Seuss Geisel or Dr. Seuss! as he is so dearly known. Dr. Seuss attended services at an Episcopal church with his parents and sister where it is said that he preferred the music and ceremonies more than the sermon. He used rhyme to memorize the books of the Bible (Becoming Dr. Seuss, by Brian Jay Jones).

Here’s a tongue twister from Oh Say Can You Say, published in 1979 when Seuss was 75! “People of my age are all retiring,” he said, “which is something I would never want for myself.”

Seuss was pleased with the ‘terrible tongue twisters’ in Oh Say Can You Say which he thought to be more difficult than those he’d written for Fox in Socks. “I suddenly came to the conclusion that we were making it too easy for kids.” Here’s an example from the book:

Are our words a reflection of who we are!!?? That’s a scary thought! Well, I’m certainly no Seuss; but, here’s my meager attempt at writing rhyme:

When you’re inclined

To say something unkind,

Practice a tongue twister instead

So not to have regrets about something you said!

Notice: Every blog, product, post, or creative piece is designed as a reminder to speak words fitly spoken - words that encourage, heal, or help in some way. We create a place that speaks to the power of words and how words affect us in our everyday lives. Sometimes something funny, sometimes gleaning from history. Maybe it’s science-based, informational, inspirational, or just a story to share. It is our hope that everything Apples in Silver moves us toward being conscience of the words we speak as we aim to make someone’s day better with the words we say.

Thank you for joining our community.

Creatively yours,

Lynette

The Final Word

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Lauren Green wrote Lighthouse Faith to show just how much the laws of God permeates everything around us and that He is actually hiding in plain sight. She says that God is so big and so small at the same time that He’s easily overlooked.

Green interviewed Michio Kaku, a physicist and rock star in the science world. His theory is that all buildings are held up by the Pythagorean theorem which states that, given a right triangle with sides a, b and c, where c represents the hypotenuse (or longest side), the sum of the square of the two sides (a squared plus b squared) is always equal to c squared.

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If Kaku’s assessment of the Pythagorean theorem is correct, then the right angle (four of which form a cross of perpendicular lines) is literally holding up every building and structure. Cathedrals, cottages, towers and temples are all held up by the mathematical relationship expressed in the Pythagorean formula. It’s there holding it in place even though there’s no visible right angle. Green believes that this mathematical fact governs architecture and is tied to the fundamental symbol of Christianity: the cross.

This lends acknowledgement to The God Particle, authored by Leon Lederman whose premise is: ‘just because you don’t see it doesn’t mean it’s not there’.

“Just because you don’t see it
doesn’t mean it’s not there.”

With eloquence, Green asserts, “Every time I look at buildings and structures today, I see crosses everywhere; in window frames, scaffolding, crown molding, even a telephone pole. Either the cross is implied, as it is in a door or window frame, or it is explicit, as in the trusses of a suspension bridge.”

She continues, “Every synagogue, every mosque, office tower, cabin, house, shack, shelf, table, bed, or chair is being held up by the cross.” It is this natural law that architects must abide by so that structures do not crumble and fall.

Even nature abides by certain mathematical principles. Trees growing up from the ground also adhere to Pythagoras’s equation. Their roots must be deep enough to counter balance the angle by which the trunk and branches stretch up and out.

Newsboys, the rock band resonates in song …

The cross has the final word
The cross has the final word
The Savior has come with the morning light
The cross has the final word

Notice: Every blog, product, post, or creative piece is designed as a reminder to speak words fitly spoken - words that encourage, heal, or help in some way. We create a place that speaks to the power of words and how words affect us in our everyday lives. Sometimes something funny, sometimes gleaning from history. Maybe it’s science-based, informational, inspirational, or just a story to share. It is our hope that everything Apples in Silver moves us toward being conscience of the words we speak as we aim to make someone’s day better with the words we say.

Thank you for joining our community.

Creatively yours,

Lynette

Dreams Do Come True

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My niece, Chloe was born at 26½ weeks. As with most preemies, she faced insurmountable challenges. One challenge being that she did not start speaking until she was almost four. Before then, her vocabulary was limited – even for a four-year-old. Therapy included encouraging her to ‘use her words’. She was not to rely on gestures or emotions to express herself.

During this time, Jade (her older cousin) dreamed a dream. In the dream, Chloe answered the door when Jade rang the bell. Chloe welcomed Jade and started talking, and talking, and talking. Jade concluded the story by saying, ‘And she wouldn’t stop!’

The dream was such an encouragement and a confirmation for all of us that Chloe would be just fine; she would use her words and hold witty conversations. She’s a junior in high school now, preparing to graduate and attend college next year. Dreams do come true.

Notice: Every blog, product, post, or creative piece is designed as a reminder to speak words fitly spoken - words that encourage, heal, or help in some way. We create a place that speaks to the power of words and how words affect us in our everyday lives. Sometimes something funny, sometimes gleaning from history. Maybe it’s science-based, informational, inspirational, or just a story to share. It is our hope that everything Apples in Silver moves us toward being conscience of the words we speak as we aim to make someone’s day better with the words we say.

Thank you for joining our community.

Creatively yours,

Lynette

Beautiful Words

In 2004, the British Council (a UK organization specializing in international cultural and educational opportunities) carried out a survey to celebrate their 70th anniversary. They asked over 7,000 learners in forty-six countries what they considered to be the most beautiful words in English. They also ran an online poll on their websites abroad. Over 35,000 people voted. Here are the top fifty most beautiful words.

Notice that the list consists of words that invoke good feelings. Perhaps a particular word is a reminder of a special event or brings to mind an amusing or pleasant memory. Notice how some words just roll off the tongue, others invite positive thoughts. Notice that the first word is “mother”.

Notice: Every blog, product, post, or creative piece is designed as a reminder to speak words fitly spoken - words that encourage, heal, or help in some way. We create a place that speaks to the power of words and how words affect us in our everyday lives. Sometimes something funny, sometimes gleaning from history. Maybe it’s science-based, informational, inspirational, or just a story to share. It is our hope that everything Apples in Silver moves us toward being conscience of the words we speak as we aim to make someone’s day better with the words we say.

Thank you for joining our community.

Creatively yours,

Lynette

Perpetual Words

We learned about the water cycle and how it works in elementary school. Every day by the process of evaporation, the warmth of the sun draws up tons of water from puddles, lakes, rivers and oceans. Plants, trees and even the ground releases water vapor by the process of evapotranspiration. We cannot see the water rising because it is a very light vapor that mixes with gases in the air and form clouds. Then it will rain, or snow, or sleet, or hail. And the cycle will begin again.

God says:

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God says that His words are like the rain that falls. It serves a purpose on earth and will ‘not return empty’. Is this also a cycle in motion?

Is it possible that our words, too, are perpetual … always moving, creating, living, working, being, doing? All the more reason for us to be mindful and careful with our words. It may not be so easy to recapture words said in anger or haste. And when we mess up (because I certainly do), be quick to get back on track to becoming a community of people giving, receiving, and circling words that bring life and hope.

Notice: Every blog, product, post, or creative piece is designed as a reminder to speak words fitly spoken - words that encourage, heal, or help in some way. We create a place that speaks to the power of words and how words affect us in our everyday lives. Sometimes something funny, sometimes gleaning from history. Maybe it’s science-based, informational, inspirational, or just a story to share. It is our hope that everything Apples in Silver moves us toward being conscience of the words we speak as we aim to make someone’s day better with the words we say.

Thank you for joining our community.

Creatively yours,

Lynette

G R A N D / O P E N I N G !

Thank you for being a part of a community devoted to sharing good words – healing words, helpful words. And we’re thrilled to offer these premiere t-shirts that complement our goals and objectives to make someone’s day [better] with the words we say. They serve as a reminder to give a word fitly spoken – say something nice, be kind, be uplifting, supportive and encouraging.

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They serve as a reminder to give a word fitly spoken

...say something nice, be kind, be uplifting, supportive and encouraging

We’ll start with our logo, designed by Taylor Gass – she’s amazing! In the future, we’ll have more designs for you. And more products too!

So … Welcome to our new store!

Many thanks to Chapman Trading our printing company for their incredible customer service. We are so grateful for this partnership.

Can you tell we’re excited?

Notice: Every blog, product, post, or creative piece is designed as a reminder to speak words fitly spoken - words that encourage, heal, or help in some way. We create a place that speaks to the power of words and how words affect us in our everyday lives. Sometimes something funny, sometimes gleaning from history. Maybe it’s science-based, informational, inspirational, or just a story to share. It is our hope that everything Apples in Silver moves us toward being conscience of the words we speak as we aim to make someone’s day better with the words we say.

Thank you for joining our community.

Creatively yours,

Lynette

SHHHHHHHH

History was made when Jennifer Kupcho became the winner of the first Amateur Women’s Championship Tournament at the Augusta National Golf Club on April 6th .

At the Nationals, besides the ambience, the exquisite grounds, pimento cheese on white bread, and their Georgia peach ice cream sandwich, another aspect of the game that I enjoy is the silence. As the player positions herself the crowd is reverently quiet. The surroundings are sublime even surreal as all becomes still. High above our heads we hear only the chirps and tweets of the occupants perched in their beautiful blooming dogwood, juniper, and magnolia trees.

The game requires precision and concentration. Silence shows respect. Noise would be a distraction. Immediately after the resounding whack when the club makes contact, patrons shout. There is an eruption of cheers and applause as if it is their energy too that moves the ball along to land on the green near its target; or, ideally, in the cup. The roar of affirmations is thunderous in contrast to the silence just moments before. Both equally important.

Oh! for us to exercise silence, mincing words that should not be uttered. And that we would become ever so vocal with accolades of praise and encouragement. The more we practice, the more proficient we will be.

Notice: Every blog, product, post, or creative piece is designed as a reminder to speak words fitly spoken - words that encourage, heal, or help in some way. We create a place that speaks to the power of words and how words affect us in our everyday lives. Sometimes something funny, sometimes gleaning from history. Maybe it’s science-based, informational, inspirational, or just a story to share. It is our hope that everything Apples in Silver moves us toward being conscience of the words we speak as we aim to make someone’s day better with the words we say.

Thank you for joining our community.

Creatively yours,

Lynette

Dead or Alive

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A word is dead
when it is said,
some say.
I say it just
begins to live
that day.

We know that words have meaning but do they have life? Emily Dickinson, the famous poet says ‘Yes!’ She references in her poem that words begin to live the moment we speak them.

When words are spoken they take on life – the life given by the speaker. Words make sounds. Sounds are vibrations that travel through the air and reach our ears. The things we say carry weight and have tremendous impact. Let the vibrations of the words we say bring life to someone in dire need of hearing something hopeful, something refreshing, something that makes them feel alive.

Notice: Every blog, product, post, or creative piece is designed as a reminder to speak words fitly spoken - words that encourage, heal, or help in some way. We create a place that speaks to the power of words and how words affect us in our everyday lives. Sometimes something funny, sometimes gleaning from history. Maybe it’s science-based, informational, inspirational, or just a story to share. It is our hope that everything Apples in Silver moves us toward being conscience of the words we speak as we aim to make someone’s day better with the words we say.

Thank you for joining our community.

Creatively yours,

Lynette

Words In A Song

Last year, I visited my daughter in Haiti during her one-year teaching assignment. While attending a service at Disciple’s Village, Son Son and Kindly sang a harmonious duet in Creole for the congregation. Then they sang in English. And I lost it!

Tears ran down my face. I had to cover my mouth to keep from being audible. Son Son and Kindly are young orphans being loved, nurtured, educated and cared for at Disciple’s Village. This is what they said in song …

I thought… They’re singing the same song that I sing! They worship like I worship! They may not have the comforts and conveniences as others but that does not affect their adoration to God.

I will always remember those two little boys who made such an impact in my life by their words and speaking those words so that I could understand. I’m confident they will grow up to be strong men and make a big difference in the communities and lives of many others.

Notice: Every blog, product, post, or creative piece is designed as a reminder to speak words fitly spoken - words that encourage, heal, or help in some way. We create a place that speaks to the power of words and how words affect us in our everyday lives. Sometimes something funny, sometimes gleaning from history. Maybe it’s science-based, informational, inspirational, or just a story to share. It is our hope that everything Apples in Silver moves us toward being conscience of the words we speak as we aim to make someone’s day better with the words we say.

Thank you for joining our community.

Creatively yours,

Lynette

Not A Conquest-But A Surrender

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In Words that Work by Frank Luntz, Luntz makes the point that his book is not about policy neither is it written for any particular party affiliation. I take the same stance in referencing his work. I don’t side with any political position. Luntz makes a practical and poignant point about the art and science of words that work and how we use them. The premise throughout the book is:

Here’s a brief excerpt from the introduction:

“…every message that that you bring into the world is subject to the interpretations and emotions of the people who receive it. Once the words leave your lips, they no long belong to you. We have a monopoly only on our own thoughts. The act of speaking is not a conquest, but a surrender. When we open our mouths, we are sharing with the world – and the world inevitable interprets, indeed sometimes shifts and distorts our original meaning.”

If we surrendered more, being careful of our words, what improvements would we see in our relationships?

Something Funny

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My grandchildren and I live in different states so FaceTime has been an invaluable way for us to talk and stay in touch. This time when they came on screen, Jazz and Drew were seated on the floor with their Mom playing a game.

“It’s so nice to see you guys playing a board game rather than watching the boob-tube,” I commented to my seven-year-old granddaughter.

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Jazz and her brother have their favorite YouTube shows that they watch (monitored by their parents of course). I found it amusing that she thought that I had mispronounced, miscommunicated, or misunderstood a word. Or, perhaps she thought that I had no concept of what YouTube might be.

My, how times have changed!

Words!

Notice: Every blog, product, post, or creative piece is designed as a reminder to speak words fitly spoken - words that encourage, heal, or help in some way. We create a place that speaks to the power of words and how words affect us in our everyday lives. Sometimes something funny, sometimes gleaning from history. Maybe it’s science-based, informational, inspirational, or just a story to share. It is our hope that everything Apples in Silver moves us toward being conscience of the words we speak as we aim to make someone’s day better with the words we say.

Thank you for joining our community.

Creatively yours,

Lynette

The Words We Speak

In his book, “What Got You Here Won’t Get You There”, Marshall Goldsmith’s narrative is written for workplace interactions, but I found his message to be appropriate for personal relationships too. Here is a snippet from Chapter 4 (Habit #4): Making Destructive Comments.

It fittingly speaks to our brand and the premise of what we stand for. Destructive comments are the cutting, sarcastic remarks that we spew out, with or without intention. Most often we don’t even remember what we said. However, the target of our thoughtless remarks are oftentimes left hurt and dejected. These comments (often disguised as candor) are insensitive. The damage is done and the words linger.

Here are a few habits to ask and practice:

   1. Will this comment help the person I’m talking to?

   2. Will this comment help the person I’m talking about?

   3. Think before you speak.

Together, let’s embark on a journey of well-being and wholeness for ourselves and others by the words we speak. Someone just might feel a little better, smile a bit more generously, even cherish the much needed compliment.

Notice: Every blog, product, post, or creative piece is designed as a reminder to speak words fitly spoken - words that encourage, heal, or help in some way. We create a place that speaks to the power of words and how words affect us in our everyday lives. Sometimes something funny, sometimes gleaning from history. Maybe it’s science-based, informational, inspirational, or just a story to share. It is our hope that everything Apples in Silver moves us toward being conscience of the words we speak as we aim to make someone’s day better with the words we say.

Thank you for joining our community.

Creatively yours,

Lynette